Weave on a Bow Loom at the March Meeting

Weave on a Bow Loom at the March Meeting

Bow loom weaving is an ancient weaving technique. Traditionally, the loom would have been a flexible tree branch with warp thread attached to both ends, flexing the bow to create tension on warp threads. Threads were separated by a piece of hide or a piece of wood.

Today, items from hardware/craft store and household items can produce a bow loom. At our meeting on Tuesday 27 March, NVWG member Carol Vales will lead us through warping a bow loom and weaving a narrow band.

Items created on bow loom are usually 4” or less in width. These include: headbands, hatbands, trim for clothing or bags, and lanyards.

Materials will be provided, but if you have a strong warp yarn you’d like to use, 5/2 or 3/2 cotton is recommended. Generally the same  yarn is used in the warp and weft. Beads may be added for decoration. Participants will be able to take their looms home with them.

Participants should bring scissors, a tapestry needle for weaving and a sharp needle for weaving in the ends. Optional: 3/2 or 5/2 cotton and size 6 beads in your color choice.

This program is made possible through the Guild’s Pauline Duke Education Fund.

Social time, snacks and library browsing start at 7 p.m. The meeting starts at 7:30.

2 Responses »

  1. NVWG member Dorothy Solbrig writes:

    “Last Summer I went to the Fenimore Museum in Cooperstown NY, where one of their strengths is American Indian Art. They had an example of a bow loom with a weaving of quills. I don’t think I can post it on the website, but here are the pics. Fascinating!”

    Fenimore Museum bowloom
    Fenimore Museum bowloom

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